Current Offerings

Internship Opportunities January 3 - March 11 2022
 
UC Santa Cruz Fort Ord Natural Reserve
Marina, Ca
 
Application Form Link: https://forms.gle/bNbt7GnfYA3kxkHf8

Ten Week internships start with the UCSC Winter Quarter on 01/03/2022. For Winter 2022, we are looking for volunteers to help with:

Reserve Stewardship and Research Support - This year we are trying an internship that introduces students to a wide variety of habitats, species, and research methods. This position may include invasive plant removal, reserve cleanups, light construction, wildlife camera maintenance and data processing, small mammal monitoring, herpetology monitoring, plant measurements, and general reserve stewardship. This is a good "job shadowing" of reserve staff, and a great way to get to know the reserve and generate connections and ideas if you are considering an independent research project or senior exit internship later in your university career.

Ecological Plant Restoration - Large scale planting and restoration work on UCSC FONR in Marina, CA. We are working to enhance the habitat at UCSC FONR, by planting thousands of seedlings of endangered sand gilia (Gilia tenuiflora ssp. arenaria). This is a great way to learn the process of site preparation, planting, and seed collection of an endangered plant.

Vegetation Surveys - Includes on the ground individual plant measurements and remote sensing via drone in long term plots around the reserve. This work will include using arcGIS so experience is a plus! 

Ten Week internships start with the UCSC Winter Quarter on 01/03/2022. Due to the nature of the work and commuting logistics, we generally need an intern to have a whole day available. Shifts are 6 hours long, not including commute time. A reserve carpool vehicle is available for commuting from UCSC Coastal Biology Campus to UCSC FONR.

We also welcome applicants from CSUMB and community colleges, let us know your schedule and we will go from there! 

Interested undergraduates may complete the following form to apply. Please be descriptive in your responses! Availability and previous experience determine selection. The internships require transportation to UCSC Fort Ord Natural Reserve in Marina, Ca. which is about 45 minutes - 1 hour drive from UCSC Campus. All UCSC Fort Ord Natural Reserve internships require teamwork and communication. There is potential for exposure to poison oak, snakes, weather, and insects.
8267269D-09D4-4A21-BEC4-CD3A708980C4_1_102_o.jpeg

General Info

Activities and opportunities for undergraduate students take place year round at the reserve, with specific opportunities that change throughout the year based of reserve and staff needs. Activities may include, but are not limited to:

maya_mammal_trapping.jpg
  • Field Trip Facilitator/Reserve Docent
  • GIS and Drone Mapping Internships
  • Wildlife Camera Trapping Studies
  • Small Mammal Population Monitoring
  • Vegetation Surveys
  • Ecological Restoration
  • Land Stewardship
  • K-12 Outdoor Education/Experiential learning projects
  • We would also love to hear your ideas for a specific project!

Interested undergraduates may send an application in the form of an email stating which activities they are interested in, relevant coursework, internships, and a brief summary of your interest in the work. Please include a copy of your class schedule and availability. Availability and previous experience determine selection. The internships require transportation to UCSC Fort Ord Natural Reserve in Marina, Ca. which is about 45 minutes - 1 hour drive from UCSC Campus. All UCSC Fort Ord Natural Reserve internships require teamwork and communication. There is potential for exposure to poison oak, snakes, weather, and insects.

Additional Opportunities for independent research and thesis projects:

Below is a partial list of potential independent undergraduate research ideas at UCSC Fort Ord Natural Reserve. Students who work on research at UCSC FONR can be assisted by FONR staff and interns throughout their projects, if needed. Topics of interest include: Coast horned lizard populations, plant-animal interactions (rabbits, woodrats, etc), grasses, annual plants, shrubs, mosses, pollination, pre-dispersal seed predation, nitrogen fixation, stand and individual plant ageing, and ecological disturbances. If you are interested in any of these or similar, please contact Joe Miller joemiller@ucsc.edu for a more detailed list of potential projects and academic advisor options. Express which topics you may be interested. Include details about your current educational goals and any relevant experience you may have.